Author Topic: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?  (Read 1235 times)

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Offline Todd Muskopf

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Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« on: February 06, 2015, 07:07:06 AM »
So, I hear podcasts all the time recommending that we send out files for processing.

Not sure how this leads to standing out from the crowd.


Offline Mike Nykoruk

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Re: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2015, 07:47:27 AM »
Nature vs Nurture  One is born homogeneous. It's not by choice.   ::)

Offline Todd Muskopf

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Re: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2015, 10:09:03 AM »
You're probably right.  In this case, the Catholic Church approves of homogeneity, which is why Catholic Schools have strict uniform guidelines.

Offline Travis Biggs

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Re: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2015, 11:36:52 AM »
So, I hear podcasts all the time recommending that we send out files for processing.

Not sure how this leads to standing out from the crowd.

It doesn't.
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Offline Darren Cassese

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Re: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2015, 11:50:56 AM »
So, I hear podcasts all the time recommending that we send out files for processing.

Not sure how this leads to standing out from the crowd.


You're assuming you are outsourcing to a company that doesn't uniquely process your work.  That's a bad business model, IMO. 

When we've discussed outsourcing on TPPF, it's generally been in terms of a higher level of customized service. 

Otherwise, simply choosing the "Artistic edit style #1" will most certainly not stand out.
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Offline Nanette Reid

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Re: Does outsourcing post lead to homogeneity?
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2015, 10:11:42 PM »
I outsource my post, but I work closely with my digital techs and I have them tailor my images to my visualisation of how I want the final shots to look.

They are individuals, they don't work for large companies, and even though 2 of the 3 are in a completely different time zone (+4hrs), we communicate regularly via Skype and telephone calls. I am sent small thumbnails to check on any images they aren't too sure of, and can advise from there if needed. I also send a list of notes in RTF, describing any specific work I need done (add grass, remove object from RHS, room has a very "contemporary feel" but still need threaten some warmth etc).

I think if you work with the same post team, once they get used to your "style" you won't have the "same as the competition" look, but how do you achieve that if you work with a large retouching company who probably doesn't assign the same person to you each and every time?

Add to that, the difference in how one culture visualises how a model should look, which then opens an entirely new can of worms - what we want and what they are used to seeing & producing, doesn't always match. I think there was a post last year which showed how different retouching was applied in different countries, and the results were "interesting".