Author Topic: When the old becomes new again  (Read 191 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jeff Behm

  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12330
    • View Profile
    • http://www.behmphoto.com
When the old becomes new again
« on: August 09, 2017, 09:53:46 AM »
The subject title above is talking about the technique, not this new robotic welder from the German Firm, Abicor-Binzel. This was photographed in A-B's US headquarters (bummer, I haven't been to Germany in a while) and the concept had to incorporate their blue and magenta corporate colors as well as demonstrate the precise movements available.  Their written comment upon seeing the gallery was "We LOVE these".  That's always a good feeling, especially from such a large corporation.

As for the "old is new" part, these are locked down multiple images with a 10 stop ND filter in front of the lens for the 70 second, f22 burn of the welder, followed by an exposure of the hero shot at the front corner so we could see the logo, followed by about 30 pops with 6 strobes.  Then we did a couple frames with just the modeling lamps to create the blurred wand in motion.   

Set up was two strobes with blue gels on the black muslin drape background (to cut crap behind), one strobe on an overhead boom with a magenta gel to accent the welder arm, one medium softbox in the back, camera-right corner for separation, a 40" softbox at 90 degrees to camera on the right and a 6' brolly box for fill, camera left.  There was a time then, with my view cameras, I might have attempted to do all but the multi pops in one frame by dropping a felt cover over the lens as we changed lighting, but I don't like the DSLR single frame options so much.  Instead, as I planned this, we decided to utilize layers in PS to accomplish it.

It always surprises me when, after trying to describe what's in my head as a concept for a shoot, even the ad guys go "Ohhhh, now I see it" upon delivery.  It's a little reminder that not everyone can do what we do, even those who we think should get it.

We did 4 different angles, with tighter and looser compositions, and spent about 5 hours at it from get-in to strike.  This type of construct is what I've done for most of my career, and it happens too rarely these days to suit me.  Made me feel really good to pull out some of the stops again.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 09:55:35 AM by Jeff Behm »

Offline Nanette Reid

  • Authenticated Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 713
    • View Profile
    • nanette reid | architectural & interior photographer
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2017, 08:21:47 PM »
And that, ladies & gentlemen, is what sorts the wheat from the chaff!!

Bravo, Jeff - I'm thinking that many of today's "camera operators", would just shoot it straight, and combine that shot with the control box in PS. The extra creativity required would either a) never cross their mind, b) be too difficult to figure out and therefore not be attempted or c) take too much effort to create onsite so "Let's do it in PS!!", and end up looking woeful.

Great shot - here's hoping you're asked to shoot their next machine in Germany.

Offline Todd Muskopf

  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6878
    • View Profile
    • http://www.muskopf.org
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 09:18:45 PM »
Sweet!

Offline Houston George

  • Resident Cheapskate
  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1143
    • View Profile
    • http://www.houstons-photography.com
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2017, 08:16:42 AM »
Great shot, impressive game planning and execution. I'm sure there's so much more gratification when you can make this happen physically, on site, instead of relying on pixel manipulation after the fact. IOW, ditto to what Nanette said!
Houston

Offline Jeff Behm

  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12330
    • View Profile
    • http://www.behmphoto.com
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2017, 12:00:25 PM »
Thanks, everybody!  I have always loved the craft, so using the whole brain for this one felt like that welcomed stretch after a long nap!  Digital has simplified life a lot, but it's taken away much in terms of craft, too. 

Offline Duck

  • Authenticated Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 272
  • Freelance commercial photographer and instructor
    • View Profile
    • Unitas Photography
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2017, 04:34:40 PM »
An amazing shot. One I would never have considered doing as you did. I would have relied more on Photoshop than colored filters, etc. I don't know if I would have thought of the multiple exposure concept either.
My name is Charles Unitas but friends call me Duck

"If you didn't learn something new today, you wasted a day."

Offline Mike Nykoruk

  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4308
    • View Profile
    • http://www.nykoruk.com
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2017, 06:52:32 PM »
Brillant!  8)  ;D

Offline Jeff Behm

  • Authenticated Members
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12330
    • View Profile
    • http://www.behmphoto.com
Re: When the old becomes new again
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2017, 12:54:17 PM »
A couple of other views, just for the fun of it.  Final delivery files were  113MB - 170MB TIFFs.